Now Reading: How to Install the Latest Version of JupyterHub on Fedora 38+/RHEL 9/Rocky Linux 9

Loading
svg
Open

How to Install the Latest Version of JupyterHub on Fedora 38+/RHEL 9/Rocky Linux 9

January 15, 202412 min read

JupyterHub is a web-based program that makes it possible to use Jupyter Notebook by multiple users in their own Jupyter environment. To learn more about the differences between JupyterHub and Jupyter Notebook/Lab, read this article.

In this article, we will show you how to install the latest version of JupyterHub on the following Linux distributions:

  • Fedora 38 and newer
  • RHEL 9
  • Rocky Linux 9

NOTE: You can install JupyterHub on other RPM-based Linux distributions as well. The same procedures should work with little to no changes.

Topic of Contents:

  1. Installing the Required Dependency Packages
  2. Creating a Python Virtual Environment for JupyterHub
  3. Upgrading Python PIP on the JupyterHub Python Virtual Environment
  4. Upgrading the Node Package Manager
  5. Installing the Configurable HTTP Proxy
  6. Installing JupyterHub in the Python Virtual Environment
  7. Creating a JupyterHub Configuration File and Systemd Service
  8. Configuring the Firewall to Allow Access to JupyterHub from Other Devices on the Network
  9. Accessing JupyterHub
  10. Creating New JupyterHub Users
  11. Configuring the FirstUseAuthenticator on JupyterHub
  12. Configuring the IDLE Culler on JupyterHub
  13. Adding a New Programming Language Support for JupyterHub
  14. Conclusion

Installing the Required Dependency Packages

First, update the DNF package database cache with the following command:

A screenshot of a computer Description automatically generatedA screenshot of a computer Description automatically generated

To install all the required dependency packages for JupyterHub, run the following command:

$ sudo dnf install python3-pip python3-devel python3-virtualenv nodejs npm git curl

To confirm the installation, press “Y” and then press <Enter>.

A screenshot of a computer program Description automatically generatedA screenshot of a computer program Description automatically generated

The required dependency packages are being downloaded from the internet. It takes a while to complete.

A screenshot of a computer program Description automatically generatedA screenshot of a computer program Description automatically generated

If you see the following prompt, press “Y” and then press <Enter> to accept the GPG key of the official Fedora package repository.

A screenshot of a computer program Description automatically generatedA screenshot of a computer program Description automatically generated

The installation should continue.

A screenshot of a computer program Description automatically generatedA screenshot of a computer program Description automatically generated

At this point, all the required JupyterHub dependencies should be installed.

A screenshot of a computer Description automatically generatedA screenshot of a computer Description automatically generated

To confirm that you have Python 3, Python 3 PIP, Node.js, and NPM installed on your computer, run the following command:

$ python3 –version

$ pip3 –version

$ node –version

$ npm –version

As you can see, we have Python 3.12.0, Python PIP 23.2.1, Node.js 20.8.1, and NPM 10.1.0 installed on our Fedora 39 system.

Creating a Python Virtual Environment for JupyterHub

It’s recommended to install JupyterHub in a Python virtual environment so it does not interfere with other Python packages that you installed from the official package repository of your Linux distribution.

To create a new Python virtual environment for JupyterHub in the “/opt/jupyterhub” directory path, run the following command:

$ sudo python3 -m venv /opt/jupyterhub

Upgrading Python PIP on the JupyterHub Python Virtual Environment

Before you install JupyterHub on the “/opt/jupyterhub” JupyterHub Python virtual environment, you should upgrade the Python PIP of the virtual environment to the latest version.

To upgrade Python PIP of the “/opt/jupyterhub” Python virtual environment to the latest version, run the following command:

$ sudo /opt/jupyterhub/bin/pip3 install –upgrade pip

The latest version of Python PIP should be installed on the “/opt/jupyterhub” virtual environment.

A screenshot of a computer Description automatically generatedA screenshot of a computer Description automatically generated

As you can see, a newer version of Python PIP (v23.3.1) is installed on the “/opt/jupyterhub” JupyterHub virtual environment.

$ pip3 –version

$ sudo /opt/jupyterhub/bin/pip3 –version

A screenshot of a computer Description automatically generatedA screenshot of a computer Description automatically generated

Upgrading the Node Package Manager

It’s also a good idea to upgrade the Node Package Manager (NPM) to the latest version.

To upgrade NPM to the latest version, run the following command:

$ sudo npm -g install npm@latest

A screenshot of a computer Description automatically generatedA screenshot of a computer Description automatically generated

As you can see, NPM is upgraded to the latest version.

Installing the Configurable HTTP Proxy

JupyterHub requires the Configurable HTTP Proxy to work. You can install the Node.js package Configurable HTTP Proxy with the following command:

$ sudo npm install -g configurable-http-proxy

The Configurable HTTP Proxy should be installed.

A screenshot of a computer Description automatically generatedA screenshot of a computer Description automatically generated

Installing JupyterHub in the Python Virtual Environment

To install JupyterHub and the required dependencies on the JupyterHub Python virtual environment “/opt/jupyterhub”, run the following command:

$ sudo /opt/jupyterhub/bin/pip3 install wheel ipywidgets jupyterlab jupyterhub

JupyterHub is being installed on the “/opt/jupyterhub” virtual environment. It takes a while to complete.

JupyterHub should be installed on the “/opt/jupyterhub” virtual environment at this point.

Creating a JupyterHub Configuration File and Systemd Service

To create the required directories for storing the JupyterHub configuration file and systmed service file, run the following command:

$ sudo mkdir -pv /opt/jupyterhub/etc/{jupyterhub,systemd}

The “/opt/jupyterhub/etc/jupyterhub” and “/opt/jupyterhub/etc/systemd” directories should be created.

A screen shot of a computer Description automatically generatedA screen shot of a computer Description automatically generated

To create a new JupyterHub “jupyterhub_config.py” configuration file in the “/opt/jupyterhub/etc/jupyterhub” directory and open it with the nano text editor, run the following command:

$ sudo nano /opt/jupyterhub/etc/jupyterhub/jupyterhub_config.py

To access JupyterHub from your network, you have to write the following lines in your “jupyterhub_config.py” file:

c = get_config()

# Configure Jupyter Hub access IP and port

c.JupyterHub.ip = ‘0.0.0.0’

c.JupyterHub.port = 80

Once you’re done, press <Ctrl> + X followed by “Y” and <Enter> to save the JupyterHub configuration file.

A screenshot of a computer Description automatically generatedA screenshot of a computer Description automatically generated

To create a new JupyterHub systemd service file which is “jupyterhub.service” (so that JupyterHub can be automatically started on system boot) in the “/opt/jupyterhub/etc/systemd” directory and open it with the nano text editor, run the following command:

$ sudo nano /opt/jupyterhub/etc/systemd/jupyterhub.service

Type in the following lines in the “jupyterhub.service” file:

[Unit]

Description=JupyterHub

After=syslog.target network.target

[Service]

User=root

Environment=“PATH=/bin:/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/
bin:/opt/jupyterhub/bin”

ExecStart=/opt/jupyterhub/bin/jupyterhub –config /opt/jupyterhub/etc/jupyterhub/jupyterhub_config.py

[Install]

WantedBy=multi-user.target

Once you’re done, press <Ctrl> + X followed by “Y” and <Enter> to save the JupyterHub systemd service file.

Systemd reads service files from the “/etc/systemd/system” directory. So, create a symbolic link of the JupyterHub systemd service file in the “/etc/systemd/system” directory with the following command:

$ sudo ln -s /opt/jupyterhub/etc/systemd/jupyterhub.service /etc/systemd/system/jupyterhub.service

To reload the systemd service database, run the following command:

$ sudo systemctl daemon-reload

Now, add the JupyterHub systemd service to the system startup of your computer (so that it automatically starts on system boot) with the following command:

$ sudo systemctl enable jupyterhub.service

A screenshot of a computer Description automatically generatedA screenshot of a computer Description automatically generated

To start the JupyterHub service, run the following command:

$ sudo systemctl start jupyterhub.service

To check if the JupyterHub service is running, run the following command:

$ sudo systemctl status jupyterhub.service

As you can see, the JupyterHub service is running[1] and it’s added to the system startup of our computer[2].

Configuring the Firewall to Allow an Access to JupyterHub from Other Devices on the Network

To allow the other devices on the network access to JupyterHub, you must configure the firewall to allow the HTTP traffic to your computer.

To allow the HTTP traffic through the firewall (so that others can access JupyterHub), run the following command:

$ sudo firewall-cmd –add-service=http –permanent

A screen shot of a computer Description automatically generatedA screen shot of a computer Description automatically generated

For the firewall changes to be applied, run the following command:

$ sudo firewall-cmd –reload

Accessing JupyterHub

To access JupyterHub from a web browser, you need to know the IP address of your computer where you installed JupyterHub.

To find the IP address of your computer, run the following command:

The IP address of our computer is 192.168.189.129. It will be different for you. So, make sure to replace it with yours from now on.

To access JupyterHub from a web browser, visit http://192.168.189.129.

You will see the JupyterHub login page shortly. By default, JupyterHub is configured to work with the users of your Linux system. So, you can log in to JupyterHub with the login username and password of any one of your Linux system users.

To log in to JupyterHub, type in the username and password of the Linux system user that you want to log in as and click on “Sign in”.

A screenshot of a computer Description automatically generatedA screenshot of a computer Description automatically generated

You should be logged in to your JupyterHub account.

A screenshot of a computer Description automatically generatedA screenshot of a computer Description automatically generated

Creating New JupyterHub Users

Since JupyterHub works with Linux system users by default, if you want to create a new JupyterHub user, you have to create a new Linux user.

If you need any assistance in creating a new JupyterHub user, read this article.

Configuring the FirstUseAuthenticator on JupyterHub

JupyterHub supports the other Authentication mechanisms as well. If you want to create the JupyterHub users on the fly and set a login password for the JupyterHub users while you log in to JupyterHub for the first time, you can configure the FirstUseAuthenticator on JupyterHub. FirstUseAuthenticator lets you create the JupyterHub users when you log in to JupyterHub for the first time as the name says.

Configuring the IDLE Culler on JupyterHub

If you plan to allow a lot of users to use JupyterHub, we recommend you to configure JupyterHub IDLE culler on JupyterHub. The JupyterHub IDLE culler detects the user sessions that are idle for a long time and stops them to save the system resources so that other active users can utilize those resources.

Adding a New Programming Language Support for JupyterHub

Other than Python, you can add a support for new programming languages on JupyterHub notebooks. All you have to do is install the JupyterHub kernel for the programming language that you want to add to JupyterHub.

If you need any assistance on adding new programming languages support for JupyterHub, read one of the following articles:

Conclusion

In this article, we showed you how to install JupyterHub on Fedora 38+, RHEL 9, Rocky Linux, and other RPM-based Linux distributions. We also showed you how to access JupyterHub from a web browser.

How do you vote?

0 People voted this article. 0 Upvotes - 0 Downvotes.
svg

What do you think?

Show comments / Leave a comment

Leave a reply

Loading
svg